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ADR Placard Labels

Posted by UK Safety on

The below is directly from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

As per their consignment procedures - Carriage of dangerous goods.

ADR

3  The relevant part of ADR is part 5. Obligations are set out in part 1.4 as follows. Note that unloader’s obligations are new for ADR 2011.

Role Obligations in ADR
Packer 1.4.3.2
Filler 1.4.3.3
Loader 1.4.3.1
Consignor 1.4.2.1
Carrier 1.4.2.2
Unloader 1.4.3.7

 4  There are linked requirements in part 8, but they make it the carrier's duty to ensure that the "transport unit" carries the documents, placards etc. that are required by Part 5.

5  Chapter 5.1 contains the general provisions and covers

  • overpacks (see definition at 1.2.1)
  • empty uncleaned packagings, tanks, vehicles and containers for carriage in bulk
  • mixed packing
  • approval and notification (uncommon)
  • certificates (mostly radioactives)

Marking and labelling of packages (ADR 5.2)

5  These words mean something different, but in both cases refer to packages.

  • Marking is described in 5.2.1 and comprises the UN Number and other information for certain classes (1, 2 and 7). Marking is also used to describe the UN package certification details (ADR 6.1.3 and in Packaging)
  • Labelling is described in 5.2.2 and comprises "hazard diamond(s)" with the Class number (e.g. "3" for flammable liquids) and subsidiary hazard where specified. Details in column 5 of Table A. Specimen labels are shown in 5.2.2.2.2. 

6  The details are to be found in the various sub-paragraphs within 5.2.1 and 5.2.2 respectively. This is highly prescriptive and includes special requirements for certain substances.

7  Size requirements are in 5.2.2.2.1.1. ADR  permits some flexibility in labelling of refrigerated liquid gases (5.2.2.2.1.1), and also allows changes to the background colour of flammable gas labels for UN1011, 1075, 1965, and 1978 (5.2.2.2.1.6 (c))

8  There is an additional requirement to display an orientation label for certain packages (5.2.1.9).

9  Working logically through the sections enables the requirements to be precisely determined.

10  There are rules in CHIP for combined supply and carriage labelling.  In any event the carriage labelling has to be applied.

Placarding and marking of vehicles etc. (ADR 5.3)

11  As with marking and labelling these words mean different things, and apply to vehicles and containers, MEGCs (multi element gas container - defined in ADR 1.2.1), tank containers, and portable tanks.

  • Placarding is described in 5.3.1 and refers to the "hazard diamonds" that are required for tanks, bulk and vehicles carrying class 1 or class 7 goods in packages.
  • Marking is described in 5.3.2 and refers to the plain orange plates carried at the front of vehicles (and on the back of vehicles carrying packages) and to the other marks on the sides and backs of vehicles.

Placarding

12  Placarding is the process of placing on the tank, container etc. the hazard diamonds referred to in column 5 of table A (analogous to labelling of packages). The precise details of sizes and so on are at 5.3.1.7. For small tanks or containers smaller placards can be used (5.3.1.7.3 - allows "package labels" to be used).

13  Placards have to be displayed as indicated in 5.3.1.2 to 5.3.1.6 according to the type of load.

Marking

14  Marking is the process of placing on the vehicle and the tank, container etc, the orange plates. See ADR 5.3.2. Marking now also includes the EHS mark. where appropriate.

15  ADR  allows the familiar plain orange plate to be divided by a horizontal black line (5.3.2.2.1).

Vehicles carrying packages

16  In all cases the plain orange plates for vehicles carrying packages are as described in ADR at 5.3.2.1.1.  A plain orange plate is fixed at front and back of the "transport unit". Note the extra requirement for vehicles carrying class 1 (explosives) and class 7 ((radio-active substances) to display placards (hazard diamonds) on both sides and the rear of the vehicle (ADR 5.3.1.5).

packaging vehicle

Carrying packages in freight containers

17  This is similar to the above but in this case the freight container should display relevant placards (hazard diamonds) on all four sides of the container.

container

18  ADR  includes Special Provision CV 36 (see 7.5.11 and table A column 18). This requires vehicles carrying packages of gases which could vitiate the atmosphere to be carried in open or ventilated vehicles/containers or if that is not feasible the cargo doors have to carry a suitable warning.

Tanks, tank containers etc

19  Different requirements apply to GB domestic journeys and international journeys. CDG Regs (at regulation 6 ) implements a national derogation that requires GB registered vehicles on GB domestic journeys to be marked with the familiar “Emergency Action Codes” (sometimes called “Hazchem codes”), and to include a telephone number for advice in the event of an emergency the requirement to display the plain orange plate at the front of the vehicle is the same as for packaged goods vehicles . Note that paragraph ) of schedule 1 allows the orange plate not to be fire resisting for tanks made before 1 January 2005. The same arrangements apply in Northern Ireland by virtue of their regulations.

GB registered vehicle on GB domestic journey

tanker

Plus EHS mark where appropriate on both sides and rear